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Fraud Friday Can You Hear Me


Fraud Friday Can You Hear Me

#FraudFriday We’ve heard from hundreds of people who have gotten calls like this, pre-recorded messages even though it sounds like a real person on the other end of the phone call from numbers that look familiar. We hesitate to answer, but we do so anyway. 
This newest scam is the latest in targeting victims on a whole different level.
The way this scam begins is when you answer the phone, and the person on the other line asks, "Can you hear me?" When you respond, "Yes,” your voice is recorded to be used as a voice signature for scammers to authorize fraudulent charges over the phone.
It may sound like an innocent question, but it can be a burden that may lead to a financial headache. The scammer may already have your financial information which is how they authorize a payment. When you dispute the charge, the scammer has altered the recording to make it seem you agreed to and authorized the transaction. 
Here are some helpful tips provided by the Federal Trade Commission to avoid being a victim of this latest scam when you don’t recognize the person asking “Can you hear me?” 
• Don’t respond, just hang up. If you get a call, don't press 1 to speak to a live operator or any other number to be removed from the list. If you respond in any way, it will probably just lead to more robocalls – and they’re likely to be scams.
• Contact your phone provider. Ask your phone provider what services they provide to block unwanted calls.
• Put your phone number on the Do Not Call registry. Access the registry online or by calling 1-888-382-1222. Callers who don’t respect the Do Not Call rules are more likely to be crooks.
• File a complaint with the FTC. Report the experience online or call 1-877-382-4357.
If you don’t know who the person is on the other end of the phone call, don’t answer!